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There’s still room available in some of the Denver tours, and we hope you’ll consider signing up for one (or two) if you haven’t already.

On Thursday, May 1st , from 3:00 to 5:00, get your bearings in downtown Denver by taking a Public Art Walking tour with art educator and lecturer Jack Kunin as guide. Public art in Denver is diverse, from 19th-century western bronzes to works by Fernando Botero, Jonathon Borofsky and Louise Bourgeois.

On Friday, May 2nd , join tour guide Annette Stott for a trip to Riverside Cemetery, Denver’s oldest, and Fairmount Cemetery, its largest. Dr. Stott’s is currently working on a book, Rocky Mountain Cemeteries: Sculpture Gardens of the Old West, in which she considers 19th-century pioneer community cemeteries and their arts in the mountain regions of Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, Idaho and Montana. Chapters include: “From Boot Hill to Fair Mount: the Transformation of Rocky Mountain Graveyards”, “Tombstone Carvers and Monument Makers of the Rocky Mountain West,” M. Rauh, Riverside Marble Works and the Gendered Cemetery,” “Mail-Order Monuments: Rocky Mountain Cemeteries in a National Context,” and “the Sepulchral Garden in Western Life.”

On Tuesday, May 6th , unwind after the conference with a trip to Boulder, Colorado, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. See the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), one of I.M. Pei’s most impressive works, set in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains just outside of Boulder, and the University of Colorado campus, with its striking “Tuscan Vernacular” architecture typified by buildings of indigenous sandstone, red barrel tile roofs and black wrought iron accents, where you’ll visit a special exhibit in the Art and Architecture Library. You’ll have time for shopping and lunch on your own on the Pearl Street Mall, a beautiful, four block pedestrian mall with historic buildings and native plantings, before the final stop, the Colorado Chautauqua National Historical Monument, comprised of cottages and lodges at the foot of Boulder’s Flatiron mountains.

We have one seat available on the Colorado Springs tour on Friday, May 2nd from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m!

If you have already registered for the conference and would like to sign up for a tour, please contact Susan Rawlyk at arlisna@mcphersonclarke.com.

Tom Riedel
Local Arrangements Co-chair

There’s still room available in some of the Denver tours, and we hope you’ll consider signing up for one (or two) if you haven’t already.

On Thursday, May 1, from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 or Friday, May 2nd from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30, you can tour Denver’s Parks and Neighborhoods, including the Denver Botanic Gardens. Toward the end of the 19th century, Frederick Law Olmstead made the case that verdant residential communities were appropriate and sustainable in the semiarid West. He illustrated how such a community could be developed in Colorado, taking advantage of mountain views, using water judiciously, respecting the prairie, and protecting the fragile land. Frederick Law Olmstead Jr. was subsequently instrumental, along with other landscape designers and Mayor Robert W. Speer, in developing the city’s park and parkway system. This tour will give you a good sense of Denver’s neighborhoods at a beautiful time of year, with spring flowers, fruit trees and lilacs in bloom. The tour’s first stop is City Park on the east side, home to the Denver Zoo and the Museum of Nature and Science, and the final stop will be on the west side at Inspiration Point park. At the highest point of the city, you’ll have an uncluttered view of the Rocky Mountains. Your tour guide will be Carolyn Etter, former manager of the city’s Parks and Recreation Department, who is a parks historian and advocate.

Also on Thursday from 1:00 to 5:00, or on Friday from 12:30 to 4:30, you can tour Denver’s Mountain Parks. In 1914, Frederick Law Olmstead Jr. prepared a “Mountain Park Preliminary Plan,” and city authorities started purchasing property and constructing roads based on his initial recommendations. While park planning in the city called for preservation of mountain views by restricting the height of buildings, in the mountains, views were protected by purchasing canyon walls, open meadows and distant peaks. This tour will take you to world famous Red Rocks Amphitheatre, Lookout Mountain, and the scenic foothill towns of Evergreen and Golden.

If you have already registered for the conference and would like to sign up for a tour, please contact Susan Rawlyk at arlisna@mcphersonclarke.com.

Tom Riedel
Local Arrangements Co-chair

Did you know that Denver was once a barren, treeless plain?  Every tree that you see now was planted by residents who wanted to transform Denver into a green oasis on the Platte River.  Our Denver Botanic Gardens (a tour stop) was once the site of a cemetery!  Learn more about the landscape architects and visionary citizens who were instrumental in creating our beautiful city.  Local expert Carolyn Etter will entertain you with interesting stories of how Denver became green while you visit our parks and neighborhoods.This tour will be offered on both Thursday, May 1 from 1:00 – 5:00 pm and on Friday, May 2 from 8:30 am to 12 noon. Don’t miss it!

Nancy Simon
Tours Coordinator

Denver conference planners have arranged several tours for you to get to know downtown Denver, Denver’s parks, neighborhoods and cemeteries, and the cities of Colorado Springs and Boulder.

  • Colorado Springs: with its stunning views of Pikes Peak and Cheyenne Mountain, Colorado Springs is situated about 70 miles south of Denver and boasts its own unique cultural attractions. You’ll pass through many unspoiled vistas (as well as some significant development) on the trip south, with the first stop at the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, which borders the campus of Colorado College. The original FAC was designed by architect John Gaw Meem, and was recently renovated and expanded. See the article in the December 16th Denver Post: [http://www.denverpost.com/search/ci_7717708] for more. After time to view the FAC collections, and lunch at the FAC’s Terrace Restaurant, you’ll visit the Van Briggle Memorial Pottery, the original location of the oldest, continuously operating art pottery in the United States. The building is well preserved and richly decorated inside and out with tiles. The tour will then head west to the historic and luxurious Broadmoor Hotel, where a guide from the Historic Preservation Alliance will show the beautiful turn of the century architecture, paintings by Maxfield Parrish, and the decorative fountains and other elements currently undergoing restoration.
  • Boulder: located about 30 miles northwest of Denver, Boulder is known for its natural beauty and as the home of the University of Colorado (CU). The tour will begin at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), one of I.M. Pei’s most impressive works, set in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains just outside of Boulder. The next stop will be on the CU campus, with its striking “Tuscan Vernacular” architecture typified by buildings of indigenous sandstone, red barrel tile roofs and black wrought iron accents, where you’ll visit a special exhibition of photo-illustrated books in the Art and Architecture Library.  The photobook collection spans the 19th-21st centuries and contains images and artists from the iconic to the virtually unknown. You’ll have time for shopping and lunch on your own on the Pearl Street Mall, a beautiful, four block pedestrian mall with historic buildings and native plantings, before the final stop, the Colorado Chautauqua National Historical Monument, comprised of cottages and lodges at the foot of Boulder’s Flatiron mountains. Built in 1911, the newly renovated Missions House Lodge features a spectacular great room with a stone fireplace in an Arts and Crafts interior.

For the full list of tours with their dates and times, check the conference web site: http://arlisna-mw.lib.byu.edu/denver2008/

Denver conference planners have arranged several tours for you to get to know downtown Denver, Denver’s parks, neighborhoods and cemeteries, and the cities of Colorado Springs and Boulder.

  • Denver Cemetery Tour: learn more about Denver through its departed denizens. Professor Annette Stott from the University of Denver, a local cemetery scholar, will lead this tour of Riverside and Fairmount cemeteries. Find out how local cemeteries reveal Denver’s transition from the Wild West to civilization, about the excavation of stone for markers, the stone carvers, and those who are buried and commemorated.
  • Denver Parks and Neighborhoods: join guide Carolyn Etter, a former manager of the Denver Parks and Recreation Department, for a tour that starts on the east side of town in City Park, with its view west over downtown Denver to the Rocky Mountains. The next stop is Cheesman Park, which borders the Capital Hill neighborhood, then you’ll have time to walk around and explore Denver’s 23-acre Botanic Gardens (admission included in tour price) [http://www.botanicgardens.org/ourgardensnew/yorkstreet.cfm.] Next, to Washington Park on the south side of town-with its lake and boating Pavillion, this is one of the most popular local spots for runners. Two parks on the west side of town, Berkeley and Sloan’s Lake, will cap the tour with views of the mountains to the west and downtown Denver to the east.
  • Denver Mountain Parks: Denver’s mountain park system comprises over 14,000 acres, from the renowned Red Rocks Park & Amphitheatre, to Genesee with its bison herd, to Buffalo Bill Cody’s gravesite and museum, which overlooks the entire Denver area. This tour to the west of town will take you into the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, including the scenic towns of Evergreen and Golden, Colorado.

For the full list of tours with their dates and times, check the program on the conference web site: http://arlisna-mw.lib.byu.edu/denver2008/

Denver conference planners have arranged several tours for you to get to know downtown Denver, Denver’s parks, neighborhoods and cemeteries, and the cities of Colorado Springs and Boulder.

  • Downtown Architecture Walking Tour: learn about Denver’s notable architecture and colorful downtown history through such buildings as the Richardsonian Romanesque Brown Palace Hotel, the Equitable Building, with its Tiffany glass windows, gleaming marble floors and walls, mosaic and ornate brass and bronze staircases, and Larimer Square, which has the second largest concentration of western Victorian buildings west of the Mississippi.
  • Public Art Walking Tour: in downtown Denver, painting and sculpture by 19th-century artists Allen Tupper True and Alexander Phimster Proctor comingles with work by contemporary artists Bernar Venet, Sol LeWitt, Fernando Botero and Jonathon Borofsky. See the “big blue bear” by Lawrence Argent, one of the conference plenary speakers.
  • Denver Performing Arts Complex: this behind-the-scenes tour provides a unique look at the Arts Complex and showcases rarely seen areas such as Actor’s Alley, where hand-painted replicas of Broadway show posters adorn the walls and feature autographs of cast members. See theatre design and construction first hand in the Tramway Building where all of the props, costumes, lighting and scenery are created for the Denver Center Theatre Company, and the stunning Ellie Caulkins Opera House, which is a 2,225-seat venue with flowing lines resembling a lyre lined with cherry wood.

For the full list of tours with their dates and times, check the conference web site: http://arlisna-mw.lib.byu.edu/denver2008/